The Good Bacteria That Your Gut Needs To Thrive – Zenwise The Good Bacteria That Your Gut Needs To Thrive – Zenwise
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digestive-health

The Good Bacteria That Your Gut Needs To Thrive

These days we’re waging a war against bacteria.

To defend ourselves, we are literally bathing ourselves and our homes in products formulated to eradicate germs. And then, there are antibiotic drugs that are designed to zap the bacteria that cause disease.

There’s no doubt you’ll want to avoid some types of bacteria – such as the ones responsible for pneumonia, strep throat, food poisoning, and more.

But here’s the rub, not all bacteria are bad!

Indeed, our bodies host a whopping 100 trillion “good” bacteria. And the lion’s share resides in our gut.

According to the New York Times, these good germs are essential for human life, needed to digest food, and even to synthesize certain vitamins.

What’s more, these bacteria do-gooders may protect us against the “bad” disease-causing bacteria by crowding them out in the gut, producing acids that inhibit their growth, and stimulating your immune system to fight them off.

When we take antibiotics to halt an infection of harmful bacteria, we can also wipe out helpful bacteria. This can alter the delicate balance of bacteria in the body, triggering gastrointestinal woes, and more.

Your body needs a constantly evolving diversity of gut bacteria throughout your life. And the greater the diversity in the gut microbiome, the better it is for your health.

Research also shows that excess sugar, processed food, poor sleep, stress, and lack of exercise can negatively impact your microbiome.

No wonder some say that our microbiome is a mirror of our lifestyle!

So, read on to find out how to put the welcome mat out for gut-friendly bacteria.

Your Healthy Gut’s MVPs


Lactobacillus

Lactobacillus species are probiotics ("good" bacteria) normally found in human digestive and urinary tracts.

It can help your body break down food, absorb essential nutrients and fight off “bad” bugs that might cause diseases. You’ll find these good guys in yogurt, fermented foods, and supplements.

Lactobacillus acidophilus is one of the most commonly used probiotics and is often recommended to treat bacterial infections of the vagina and preventing diarrhea caused by antibiotics and infection.

Bifidobacteria

The “good” bacteria living in your gut is mostly bifidobacteria. These go-getters begin colonizing the GI system almost immediately after birth. Bifidobacteria come in about 30 different stains.

Bifidobacteria bifidum, in particular, may help fend off unhealthy bacteria. Research suggests they also can relieve IBS symptoms. Other types of bifidobacteria may help with digestive issues and even reported to improve cholesterol levels in women and people with type 2 diabetes.

Welcome In the Good Guys!


We’ve already established that a healthy gut flora that’s rich in friendly bacteria is essential for overall health. But how do you actually improve your gut flora

Experts suggest we prioritize sleep, reduce stress, and exercise daily. Also strive for a diet packed with healthy prebiotic foods, such as legumes, onions, asparagus, and bananas. And be sure to load up on probiotic foods, including yogurt and other fermented food sources.

Most of us could also benefit from an effective probiotic/prebiotic supplement.

Fortunately, Zenwise has got your back. We’re dedicated to improving your digestive health with quality supplements that can help put the welcome mat out for the good guys.

If you’re looking for additional digestive health support, Zenwise offers a wide range of solutions.

Have questions? Our customer service team can help at support@zenwise.com or M-F from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at (800) 940-1972.

 

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/14/health/human-microbiome-project-decodes-our-100-trillion-good-bacteria.html
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/14507586/
https://www.healthline.com/health/cold-flu/good-bad-germs#Types-of-Probiotics-and-What-They-Do
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21418261/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2904929/

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